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Bluffton, SC

By Luana M. Graves Sellars

Steeped in small-town charm and rich in history, the Town of Bluffton is both old and new. Bluffton has become one of the fastest-growing towns in America and like most popular neighborhoods, is experiencing the clash between the slow pace of the past and the rapid development that its proximity to Hilton Head Island brings.

The Ruins at Palmetto Bluff
Photo Credit: LMGS
The Cordray House
 
Cordray House, was built in 1910. According to the 1860 Census for St. Luke’s Parish, the listed residents of the house included Isaac H. Martin, who was a mason and a free black man, his wife Pauline their children. In 1863 during the Burning of Bluffton, the Martin house was set afire by federal troops.
Historic Campbell Chapel African Methodist Church, Bluffton, SC
Photo Credit: LMGS

Campbell Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church

Recently added as the second structure in historic Bluffton to be placed on the National Historic Registry of Historic Places, the Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Chapel, which was originally built in 1853, has deep roots in the town’s history.

The original building is recognized as the oldest sanctuary in the town. Purchased in 1874 by nine former slaves, who were interested in establishing a church with the popular a black denomination, called the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The founding members of the church were: Jacob Chislom, Renty Fields, William Ferguson, Jeffrey Buncombe, William Smiley, David Heyward, Christopher Bryan, Theodore Wilson and William Lightburn.

The church, which has had a continuously active congregation, just celebrated its 166th year anniversary.

The Cordray House, Bluffton SC
Photo Credit: Town of Bluffton

The Cordray House

Cordray House, was built in 1910. According to the 1860 Census for St. Luke’s Parish, the listed residents of the house included Isaac H. Martin, who was a mason and a free black man, his wife Pauline their children. In 1863 during the Burning of Bluffton, the Martin house was set afire by federal troops.

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